Free training for North Yorkshire private sector landlords

Free training covering the fundamentals of being a private sector landlord is on offer next month.

North Yorkshire Council is working with the National Residential Landlord Association to provide Landlord Fundamental training on Friday, March 8. It takes place online from 9.30am until 4pm.

The training will cover:

  • Pre-tenancy and liabilities for Energy Performance Certificates, tax and insurance.
  • Responsibilities of a landlord surrounding tenancy agreements, Tenants Fees Act, gas safety, HMOs (houses in multiple occupation) and licensing.
  • Property standards including Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS), repairs, dampness and risk assessments.
  • Setting up different types of tenancy agreements, deposits and rent setting.
  • Obligations during the tenancy including periodic visits, tenant obligations, and anti-social behaviour.
  • Ending a tenancy with the relevant notices, what to do if the tenant wants to leave, possession and eviction.

North Yorkshire Council’s executive member for housing, Cllr Simon Myers, said: “Working with the National Residential Landlord Association has allowed us to provide a range of training and support to our landlords. This training covers a wide range of details about the fundamentals of being a landlord and what it entails.

“I encourage as many landlords as possible to get involved whether you are a new landlord or a landlord with many years’ experience, this training can support you. Regulations surrounding landlords and the private sector are always changing, keeping up to date with the fundamentals allows landlords to be fully prepared.”

Places are limited and will be allocated on a first come, first served basis. Visit the National Residential Landlords Association website to book a place: https://www.nrla.org.uk/training-academy/core-courses/north-yorkshire-landlord-fundamentals

1 Comment

  1. How much tax-payers’ money is being spent on this ?
    Training for Landlords should be compulsory and the cost come out of their own pockets – they are in the business to make money, after all!

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